Jobs

Please send an email to jobs@cleaweb.org if you would like to post a position on our jobs board. Submit the job positing as a Word document or in the body of the e-mail. The postings are updated on a weekly basis.

  • 28 Oct 2022 4:56 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    FAULKNER UNIVERSITY'S THOMAS GOODE JONES SCHOOL OF LAW (Montgomery, AL) invites applications for a clinical faculty position overseeing the school's Mediation Clinic, beginning in Fall 2023.  The school is particularly interested in candidates with practical experience and academic interest in dispute resolution models.  Materials should be submitted online at https://faulkner.applicantpro.com/jobs.  Questions may be addressed to Professor Andy Olree at aolree@faulkner.edu.


  • 26 Oct 2022 11:04 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    THE UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA's Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) is seeking to hire a bold and dynamic technology lawyer to join its team as Staff Counsel. The position combines working on high-impact litigation and public policy matters in the area of law & technology with providing an exceptional clinical educational experience to our JD students. The position is for two years with the possibility of renewal contingent on funding. Successful candidates must be admitted to the bar in a Canadian jurisdiction. Visit the link below for more information on the position and for instructions on how to apply. The deadline is November 20. Please direct any questions to Vivek Krishnamurthy, CIPPIC's Director, at vivek.krishnamurthy@uottawa.ca.

    https://uottawa.njoyn.com/CL2/xweb/XWeb.asp?NTKN=c&clid=27081&Page=JobDetails&Jobid=J1022-0432&BRID=324405&lang=1 


  • 26 Oct 2022 1:55 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    THE GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY LAW CENTER is hiring for an Appellate Litigation Graduate Teaching Fellowship for 2023-2025.

    The Appellate Litigation Program offers a two-year graduate fellowship for candidates interested in earning an LL.M. and training as appellate advocates in the federal courts.  The Appellate Litigation Program accepts appointments to represent indigent clients in a broad range of cases, including habeas, constitutional tort, immigration, and administrative law cases, and fellows work on all aspects of the cases.  In addition to arguing at least one case in a federal court of appeals, the fellows work with students and the Director on cases pending in the federal courts of appeals, the United States Supreme Court, and the Board of Immigration Appeals.  The fellows supervise student written work and oral advocacy preparation in order to enhance the student learning process and to develop the fellows’ own skills as clinicians and litigators.

    The fellows also jointly teach (with the Director) the Appellate Litigation Program's weekly seminar, exploring many aspects of appellate brief-writing, appellate procedure, client communication, and professional responsibility.  Fellows also have the opportunity to work with Georgetown’s Supreme Court Institute that conducts moot courts for attorneys preparing to argue before the Supreme Court of the United States.  The fellowship helps prepare fellows for careers in teaching and/or litigation. 

    The next available fellowship will begin in the summer of 2023.  Applications will be considered on a rolling basis.

    Interested persons should apply by submitting their applications electronically via email (preferred) to the following address:  lawapplit@georgetown.edu.   Your application should consist of resume, writing sample, official law school transcript, and cover letter addressed to: Professor Erica J. Hashimoto, Director, Appellate Litigation Program, Georgetown University Law Center, 111 F Street, N.W., Room 306, Washington, D.C. 20001-2095.  You may also submit your application via U.S. mail to the address above.

    Applicants should be aware that the application process has become increasingly competitive.  Fellows who are not members of the D.C. Bar must apply for admission no later than 90 days after the commencement of the fellowship.  Candidates should have at least one year of relevant experience beyond the J.D. degree (e.g., clerkship, government or private practice) and membership in a state bar.  Superior writing skills and a strong academic background are required.  A federal clerkship, appellate litigation experience, teaching experience, and experience with criminal or civil rights litigation are highly desirable.

  • 25 Oct 2022 3:12 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL seeks applicants for a full-time clinical faculty position, beginning July 1, 2023. The successful applicant will direct the Stanton Foundation First Amendment Clinic focused on speech, press, and assembly rights. In addition to teaching a live-client clinic, the successful applicant may also have the opportunity to teach a non-clinical course and to engage in writing as well as community and professional service. The final candidate for this position must successfully complete a background check.

    Location

    Nashville, TN

    Open Date

    Oct 05, 2022

    Qualifications

    • Excellent academic credentials and practice experience
    • Ability to engage in research and writing
    • Educational requirement:  J.D. degree

    Application Instructions

    Please submit a cover letter, resume, and references. Applications are considered and interviews are scheduled on a rolling basis until the position is filled or the application window closes.

    Application Process

    This institution is using Interfolio's Faculty Search to conduct this search. Applicants to this position receive a free Dossier account and can send all application materials, including confidential letters of recommendation, free of charge.

    Apply Now

    Equal Employment Opportunity Statement

    In compliance with federal law, including the provisions of Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, Executive Order 11246, the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974 as amended by the Jobs for Veterans Act, and the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act, as amended, and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, Vanderbilt University does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of their race, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military service, covered veterans status, or genetic information in its administration of educational policies, programs, or activities; admissions policies; scholarship and loan programs; athletic or other university-administered programs; or employment. In addition, the university does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of their gender expression. Requests for information, inquiries or complaints should be directed to these offices: 

    The Equal Opportunity and Access Office (EOA) receives all other complaints of discrimination, harassment, retaliation and requests for accommodations: Telephone 615-343-9336; email eeooinfo@vanderbilt.edu; online reporting form; additional information: https://www.vanderbilt.edu/eoa/


  • 21 Oct 2022 2:37 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    DUKE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW seeks a Supervising Attorney to join our Criminal Defense Clinic. We seek candidates with a demonstrated commitment to teaching and mentorship, indigent criminal defense, and multi-faceted advocacy to combat racial injustice and end mass incarceration.

    The successful candidate will work closely with the Clinic’s Director to teach in the Clinic’s seminar and supervise student direct representation fieldwork. The ideal candidate will also be prepared to work collaboratively with the Clinic’s Director to build community partnerships, design and implement novel science-based trial advocacy tools, and collaborate across the law school and University to pursue systemic criminal justice reform. In addition, the successful candidate may have the opportunity to pursue other interests, such as non-clinical teaching in Duke Law’s curriculum and/or related research.

    We would expect the successful candidate to join the Duke Law faculty, full-time, in the summer of 2023. The precise contours of the position will be tailored to the strengths and interests of the successful applicant and formalized with his or her input. Specific academic title and terms of employment will be determined based upon the successful applicant’s qualifications.

    Minimum requirements include a J.D. (or foreign equivalent), at least three years of substantive legal experience providing exemplary representation to indigent clients in criminal court, and membership in the North Carolina Bar (or eligibility for admission and a willingness to become a member). The ideal candidate will also offer:

    1. Experience in clinical teaching and student mentoring;

    2. A commitment to client-centered and community-based criminal defense;

    3. Skill in incorporating research and data in direct client representation and/or systemic reform advocacy; and

    4. A passion for building local and interdisciplinary collaborations to combat racial injustice in the criminal law system and end mass incarceration.

    Interested applicants must apply via Academic Jobs Online at

    https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/23339 no later than December 2, 2022. Applicants should also please submit their letter of interest; résumé; and a diversity, equity, and inclusion statement via email to Marlen Iraheta at: marlen.iraheta@law.duke.edu.

    Please share this announcement with those who might be interested. Questions about this position may be addressed to Elana Fogel, Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Criminal Defense Clinic at: fogel@law.duke.edu.

    Duke University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer committed to providing employment opportunity without regard to an individual's age, color, disability, gender, gender expression, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status.

    Duke aspires to create a community built on collaboration, innovation, creativity, and belonging. Our collective success depends on the robust exchange of ideas-an exchange that is best when the rich diversity of our perspectives, backgrounds, and experiences flourishes. To achieve this exchange, it is essential that all members of the community feel secure and welcome, that the contributions of all individuals are respected, and that all voices are heard. All members of our community have a responsibility to uphold these values.

    Information about Duke University’s requirements for COVID-19 vaccines for faculty, staff and students is published here: https://covidvaccine.duke.edu/.


  • 21 Oct 2022 2:35 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    GEORGETOWN LAW is hiring a clinical teaching fellow for its Environmental Law & Justice Clinic.

    Clinic Description

    Georgetown’s Environmental Law & Justice Clinic (“ELJC” or the “Clinic”) conducts public interest legal work on behalf of underserved clients in the areas of environmental justice, pollution control, natural resources, and climate. The Clinic is an immersive and multi-modal experience, exposing students to the broad range of work in which environmental attorneys engage. We teach students key lawyering and advocacy skills through work on live cases that are excellent learning vehicles.

    Our case load involves a mix of litigation matters, regulatory work, and other advisory projects. We select cases of national importance and/or local necessity in which we can protect and promote the health of historically marginalized communities, and the health of wild places and resources. The ELJC advocates on behalf of groups ranging in size from small community groups to tribes to large environmental or public justice organizations.

    The students, most of whom are in their third year of law school, work in the clinic full time and receive credit for an entire semester of law school work.  The students work on projects under the supervision of an environmental clinical fellow/supervising attorney and faculty member.  The students also participate in seminars dealing with issues of federal administrative and litigation practice, various substantive fields of law, and issues of professional responsibility as well as team project meetings in which students present some issue that has arisen in their project to their fellow students and supervisors. 

    The Clinic Director is Sara Colangelo, an alumna of the Clinic. From 2015 to the spring of 2021 Professor Colangelo served as the Director of Georgetown’s Environmental Law & Policy Program, and taught multiple environmental law courses. For many years prior to returning to Georgetown, she was a DOJ Trial Attorney in the Environmental Enforcement Section of the Environment & Natural Resources Division. At DOJ, Professor Colangelo managed complex civil environmental enforcement cases and was selected to train and mentor new Honors Program attorneys and interns. She has won numerous awards for her trial work and advocacy, and recently won Georgetown’s Fahy Award for excellence in teaching.

    Description of the Fellowship

              The Clinic is hiring one lawyer to serve as a clinical teaching fellow and supervising attorney for a two year term beginning in July 2023. The fellow will have several areas of responsibility, with an increasing role in the Clinic as the fellowship progresses. The fellow will:

    ·       Supervise students’ day-to-day clinical projects, working closely with the students on improving their lawyering skills, especially legal research, writing, and analysis. Much of the supervising attorney's time is spent guiding students in conducting legal and factual research, reviewing student drafts, making suggestions for improvement, and preparing the students for oral presentations. Fellows are expected to give and receive formal and informal feedback in timely, constructive, respectful ways;

    ·       Take responsibility for his or her own case load, including various opportunities to engage in advocacy, including arguments before administrative, state, and federal judges;  

    ·       Share responsibility for designing and teaching seminar sessions;

    ·       Take an active role in project/case development and assist with administrative and case handling responsibilities of the Clinic;

    ·       Participate in a clinical pedagogy seminar and other activities designed to support an interest in clinical teaching and legal education.

    This fellowship offers an opportunity to work on interesting, often cutting-edge matters. Fellows assume substantial responsibility for projects at an early stage of their careers and generally play a more important role in the decision-making process than do their contemporaries in other types of law practice. They also have an opportunity to work on a variety of cases, at different stages of development, so they gain a broader understanding of how cases are developed and how the litigation process, in particular, works. Fellows work closely with a broad range of public interest organizations, meeting others who are involved in public interest law and seeing how their organizations function. For those with an interest in clinical teaching, fellows get first-hand experience in clinical supervision, and also participate in, and often co-teach, seminars.

    Qualifications                 

             

    .   at least two years post-J.D. work experience in environmental law or related fields; experience with public interest environmental litigation valuable but not necessary

    .   exceptional legal writing and communications skills, and experience and interest in helping others improve their legal writing, research, and analytical skills

    ·       commitment to creating a diverse, equitable, and inclusive learning environment and commitment to exhibiting emotional intelligence and awareness of the needs of individuals from different races, cultures, backgrounds, and orientations

    .   admission (or willing to be admitted as soon as possible) to the D.C. Bar

    Pay and Other Benefits

              The annual stipend for the position will be at least $57,000 the first year and $60,000 the second year plus an opportunity to participate in group health insurance and other benefits, including unlimited free access to a state-of-art, on-site fitness center.  Georgetown University Law Center awards an LL.M in Advocacy to each fellow upon completion of their two-year term.

    How to Apply?

    Please submit a single PDF file with the following documents in this order: cover letter, resume/CV, law school transcript, three references with contact information (we will only contact references following interviews), and a writing sample that is no longer than 10 pages and not significantly edited by someone else to Clinic Administrator, Niko Perazich, at nwp2@georgetown.edu. Applications will be accepted and reviewed on a rolling basis until December 9th, 2022.


  • 21 Oct 2022 2:34 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY LAW CENTER's Civil Rights Clinic invites applications for a two-year graduate fellowship position to start in August 2023.

    Civil Rights Clinic

    Professor Aderson Francois is the director of the Civil Rights Clinic and Voting Rights Institute (CRC). Professor Francois joined the faculty in 2016. Prior to joining the Georgetown faculty, Professor Francois directed the Civil Rights Clinic at Howard University School of Law, where he also taught Constitutional Law, Federal Civil Rights, and Supreme Court Jurisprudence.

    CRC operates as a public interest law firm, representing individual clients and other public interest organizations, primarily in the areas of discrimination and constitutional rights, workplace fairness, and open government. Beginning in the Fall of 2016, the section expanded its work into the area of voting rights. Students interview clients, develop case theories, draft and file complaints in state and federal courts, conduct discovery, engage in motions practice, and prepare appeals. Students also file FOIA requests and analyze responsive documents, and work in coalition with other public interest organizations to develop impact cases. Recent projects include:

    • Litigating multiple Eighth Amendment claims against state and federal officials, and private medical providers on behalf of an incarcerated persons;
    • Litigating an employment discrimination claim against a federal agency on behalf of an employee using a novel theory of intersectionality on the basis of race, gender, and age;
    • Litigating First Amendment retaliation claims against municipal agencies on behalf of Black Lives Matter protestors;
    • Litigating employment discrimination action involving pay disparity on behalf of a woman faculty member at a state higher education institution;
    • Litigating false arrest, wrongful death, and Fourth Amendment violation claims against the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department;

    • Litigating on behalf of an individual whose employer improperly denied her the lactation breaks she was entitled to under state and federal law;
    • Litigating on behalf of an individual whose employer improperly denied her disability and pregnancy accommodations, discriminated against her on account of her national origin, and illegally assessed fees against her in connection with her resignation;
    • Filing amicus briefs in multiple appellate cases before the United States Supreme Court, and the DC Circuit;
    • Filing FOIA requests and using the responsive documents to prepare reports exposing government misconduct;
    • Drafting national report on the use of criminal fines and fees to suppress voting rights;
    • Preparing and arguing multiple appeals in federal court, in the DC Circuit, the Fourth Circuit, and the Fifth Circuit.

    What do the Clinical Teaching Fellows do?

    Fellows are responsible for day-to-day supervision of the students and work closely with the students on improving their lawyering skills, especially legal writing. In the civil rights section, the fellow has principal responsibility for about half of the docket and supervises all facets of the litigation. Much of the fellow’s time is spent guiding students in legal and factual research, reviewing student drafts, making suggestions for improvement, and preparing the students for oral presentations. In recent years, fellows have worked on all phases of litigation, including taking depositions, handling evidentiary hearings, and briefing cases before federal district courts, courts of appeals, and the U.S. Supreme Court. Fellows also play a key role in case development and in planning other CRC activities. Fellows participate in case rounds and assist in teaching seminars on litigation practice and substantive law.

    Past fellows have emphasized that the CRC experience is unique in several respects:

    First, the fellows work on interesting, often cutting-edge litigation. In light of our broad agenda, we have leeway to develop cases that present unique educational opportunities for students and fellows and have a significant impact on the law.


    Second, fellows assume substantial responsibility and generally play a more important role in the decision making process than do their contemporaries in other types of law practice. They work on a variety of cases in different stages of the litigation process and gain a broad understanding of how litigation works, from interviewing a potential client through appealing to the Supreme Court. Fellows also work closely with other CRC fellows and other public interest organizations, meeting other lawyers involved in public interest law and seeing how their organizations function.

    Third, fellows work closely with a full-time faculty member who has substantial litigation experience and expertise. As part of the Georgetown Law community, fellows are encouraged to attend seminars, workshops, and programs both on and off campus. Georgetown provides substantial support and guidance for fellows interested in pursuing academic scholarship or careers.

    Fellows must be members of the District of Columbia Bar or take immediate steps to apply for membership (through reciprocity or examination) after taking the position.

    Pay and other benefits

    The annual salary is $57,000 for the first year of the fellowship and $60,000 for the second year. The fellow also receives health and dental benefits and all tuition and fees in the L.L.M. program. Fellows also have unlimited free access to a state-of- the-art, on-site fitness center. As full-time students, fellows qualify for deferment of their student loans. Fellows may be eligible for loan repayment assistance from their law schools.

    How to apply

    Applicants should submit

    • a brief statement explaining the applicant’s interest in the position
    • a résumé
    • a law school transcript
    • a list of references, including contact information
    • a recent legal writing sample of any length representing the applicant’s most challenging legal work. Please do not send an excerpt. The writing sample should not be a collaborative work or significantly edited by someone else.

    The application materials should be sent in a single PDF file attached to an email to Niko Perazich at Niko.Perazich@law.georgetown.edu.

    Applications will be considered on a rolling basis, and the position will remain open until filled. We will select candidates to be interviewed. Although we will not pay candidates’ travel expenses, we will try to arrange interviews at a time convenient for the candidate.


  • 21 Oct 2022 2:33 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    GEORGETOWN LAW's full-time Appellate Courts Immersion Clinic is seeking applicants with significant appellate litigation experience for a two-year fellow/appellate litigator position to start in July or August 2023. Working with the Clinic director, the fellow will litigate and mentor students on complex public-interest appeals in federal courts of appeals nationwide and in the U.S. Supreme Court. The fellow’s responsibilities include arguing federal appeals.

    What is the Appellate Courts Immersion Clinic?

    Under the supervision of the Clinic director Brian Wolfman, deputy director Maddie Meth, and fellow Esthena Barlow, Georgetown Law students represent parties to appeals. The Clinic occasionally represents amici as well. The Clinic’s appeals involve a wide range of federal statutory and constitutional law. On the civil side, we handle all manner of appeals, including civil-rights, employment, consumer, environmental, tort, and education-law cases. We also handle immigration, criminal, and habeas appeals. To date, about three-quarters of our work has been in federal courts of appeals and about one-quarter in the Supreme Court.

    Students take a lead role in researching and writing complex appellate briefs in an intensive, collaborative learning environment. Teams of two to three students work directly with one of the fellows and Prof. Wolfman through multiple drafts of outlines and briefs. On each project, the student-to-instructor ratio will be no greater than three to one. Every aspect of appellate advocacy—argument choice, argument ordering, research methods, use of authority, writing style and tone, and word choice, to name a few—is discussed and debated within the team and with the instructors. The fellow must be committed to working with students so that they can jointly produce the finest product. No document is filed with a court unless it meets the highest standards.

    Over the semester, each student—again, working in a team—generally will be principally responsible for at least two significant litigation projects (for instance, an opening appellate brief and a petition seeking discretionary appellate review in the Supreme Court or another appellate court). In addition to completing the work with “their” teams, each student will be required to study and critique drafts produced by other teams in clinic-wide collaborative reviews. These reviews bring fresh, critical eyes to each project and help create a mission-oriented, collaborative law-office atmosphere.

    The Clinic also conducts weekly case “rounds” and classes. We might hold a traditional class on a relevant legal doctrine, discuss progress in pending litigation or potential new cases, or visit with special guests, such as appellate litigators and judges.

    The Clinic is a comprehensive educational experience. Students enroll in the Clinic full-time for one semester. In addition to the Clinic itself, students take a mandatory two-credit, separately assessed appellate courts seminar covering the substantive law of the appellate courts, brief writing, and other aspects of appellate practice. Students may not enroll in any other courses.

    What Clinic fellows do?

    Fellows are responsible for day-to-day mentoring of students and work closely with students on improving their lawyering skills. Each fellow is principally responsible for about a third of the docket and will supervise students in all facets of each appeal. Fellows are expected to argue cases before federal courts of appeals. With experience, a fellow may also help teach classes on appellate law and practice and play a key role in case development and in planning other Clinic activities.

    Clinic fellows are integral to the success of Georgetown Law’s clinical education program. Georgetown provides significant support and guidance for fellows interested in pursuing academic scholarship and careers. In the first year of their fellowship, fellows participate in a clinical pedagogy seminar and other activities designed to support an interest in clinical teaching and legal education. As part of the Georgetown Law community, fellows are encouraged to attend seminars, workshops, and programs both on and off campus. Successful completion of the fellowship results in the award of an L.L.M. in Advocacy from Georgetown University. Over 100 former Georgetown Law clinical fellows are currently full-time legal academics, both as law-school clinicians and doctrinal faculty. Every year, fellows graduate our fellowship program and become law teachers. Other former fellows are prominent members of the public-interest bar.

    The Clinic’s appellate litigation

    The Clinic litigates complex public-interest appeals nationwide. We’ve handled a wide range of matters in the Supreme Court, and though we’ve been around for only five years, we’ve already handled appeals in eleven of the federal circuits (and a couple state appellate courts too). Our clients run the gamut—from employees seeking remedies for discrimination to people harmed by vehicle defects to a national organization championing retirees’ pension rights to a criminal defendant maintaining (rightly, as it turned out) that his sentence was unlawful. And, as already noted, we’ve been tackling a wide range of legal issues: from the breadth of protections under the Family and Medical Leave Act, to the constitutional rights of prisoners held in solitary confinement, to the standards for avoiding deportation under the Convention Against Torture, to workers’ rights to minimum wages and overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act, to wage theft claims under the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, to the rights of children under the federal special-education law, to the “reasonable accommodation” requirement of the Americans with Disabilities Act, to name just a few.

    The Clinic director

              Fellows work closely with the Clinic’s faculty director, Brian Wolfman. He joined Georgetown Law’s permanent faculty in fall 2016 to design and direct the Appellate Courts Immersion Clinic. He came to Georgetown from Stanford Law School, where he was a Professor of the Practice of Law and co-Director of the Stanford Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. After clerking for a federal appellate judge, he worked as a poverty lawyer in rural Arkansas. He then did trial and appellate litigation for nearly 20 years at Public Citizen Litigation Group, a national public-interest law firm, serving the last five years as the Group’s director. From 2009 to 2014, he was at Georgetown, directing the school’s Civil Rights clinic. In addition to extensive trial-court experience, Prof. Wolfman has litigated hundreds of cases in the Supreme Court and the federal courts of appeals.

    What qualifications are we looking for?

    We prefer to hire someone with significant experience as a practicing appellate lawyer. Applicants must demonstrate 

    ·  commitment to public-interest law

    ·  excellent analytical, writing, and communication skills

    ·  interest in clinical legal education

    ·  experience or at least a strong interest in appellate litigation

              Fellows must be members of the District of Columbia Bar or take immediate steps to apply for membership (through reciprocity or examination) after taking the position.

    Pay and other benefits

    The annual salary is $57,000 for the first year of the fellowship and $60,000 for the second year. The fellow also receives health and dental benefits and all tuition and fees in Georgetown Law’s L.L.M. program. Fellows also have unlimited free access to a state-of-the-art, on-site fitness center. As full-time students, fellows qualify for deferment of their student loans. Fellows may be eligible for loan repayment assistance from their law schools.

    How to apply

    Applicants should submit

    ·   a brief statement (in a cover letter or otherwise) explaining the applicant’s interest in the position

    ·   a résumé

    ·   a law-school transcript

    ·   a list of references, including contact information

    ·   a recent legal writing sample of any length representing the applicant’s most challenging legal work. Please do not send an excerpt. The writing sample should not be a collaborative work or significantly edited by someone else.

       The application materials should be sent in a single PDF file attached to an email sent to Niko Perazich at nwp2@georgetown.edu.

              Applications will be considered on a rolling basis, and the position will remain open until filled. We will select candidates for an interview. Although we do not pay candidates’ travel expenses, we will try to arrange interviews at a time convenient for the candidate. Interviews may be conducted via Zoom, depending on the state of the pandemic and the candidate’s preference.


  • 20 Oct 2022 10:34 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    WESTERN NEW ENGLAND UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW seeks entry-level or lateral applicants for a full-time, tenure-track faculty appointment starting in August 2023. We are seeking candidates interested facilitating and coordinating our externship placements.

    Qualified candidates must possess a J.D. degree, have a distinguished law school record, and have successful experience in a judicial clerkship, law practice and/or teaching.  Faculty members in the School of Law must also commit to remaining current in the scholarly life of the discipline and should carry out professional scholarly activities such as attendance at professional conferences, research, and scholarly writing projects within the discipline.  All applications should include a letter of application explaining areas of teaching interest and a CV that includes a record of publications and scholarly agenda.

    The committee also invites candidates to include a diversity statement with their submission. A diversity statement of one to two pages can discuss equity, inclusion, and diversity as reflected in the candidate’s personal experiences as well as their teaching, mentorship, scholarship, service and professional activities that seek to empower marginalized students and/or communities. A diversity statement is not necessary if a candidate feels that their commitment to diversity is sufficiently reflected in their other application materials, including their publications and scholarly agenda.

    Western New England University is a private, independent, coeducational institution founded in 1919. Located on an attractive 215-acre suburban campus in Springfield, Massachusetts, Western New England University serves 3,800 students, including more than 2,600 full-time undergraduate students. Undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs are offered through Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business, Engineering, and Pharmacy, and School of Law.

    Western New England University is an Equal Opportunity Employer.  We welcome candidates whose background may contribute to the further diversification of our community.

    For inquiries about this position, please contact Professor Bob Statchen, Chair of the Faculty Personnel Committee (rstatchen@law.wne.edu) or Dale-Marie Dahlke, Law School Operations Officer (dalemarie.dahlke@law.wne.edu).


  • 20 Oct 2022 9:09 PM | Michael Murphy (Administrator)

    GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF LAW is searching for a clinical faculty member to work in our externship program. GSU Law is home to a talented and growing group of clinical faculty. Clinical faculty have voting rights and are eligible for presumptively renewable contracts after 5 years.

    We will be reviewing applications on a rolling basis. We hope to fill the position as early as Spring 2023 or later by agreement. The position is posted on academic jobs online here:  https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/23321

    You can direct questions to Kendall Kerew at kkerew@gsu.edu.


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